One Down - One to Go!

Xenos wing

All has not been quiet in ye 'olde aeroplane factory since we got back from AirVenture. With another kit coming in late September, and the shop fully up and running, it was time to get moving on the wings for the Xenos, and the result is now a finished left lifting surface, with the right framework ready to go on the workbench to get its skin in the next couple of weeks! No, we have no intention of finishing up the motor glider before the little jet arrives, but it would be nice to have the majority of the metal work done so that it's "just" a matter of systems work and over-all integration. You know -the last 90% or so... Continue reading "One Down - One to Go!"

Barry Haley's Pelican

N712PL-Barry-Haley-Pelican

My Ultravia Pelican PL was started back in the 1990s by Dick Randolph, a WWII P-47 fighter pilot who served with the 313th Fighter Squadron 50th Fighter group. As a First Lieutenant he was involved with battles at Ardennes and Rhineland in Central Europe. Dick may very well have flown missions over battlegrounds where my dad was fighting as a sniper with the Canadian Lincoln and Welland regiment. Continue reading "Barry Haley's Pelican"

AirVenture Whatsit?

It was this head-on view that first captured our attention in Homebuilt Camping. Thinking we might be looking at a 7/8 scale Navion we had to go take a look.

You're forgiven if you thought Homebuilt Camping at AirVenture was an RV fly-in. The Van Grunsven aluminum squad so out numbers all other designs that anything different--other than a Thorp T-18--really stands out. Continue reading "AirVenture Whatsit?"

Old Dog, New Trick

I've been working on airplanes for a long time, and some things I do a certain way because I have always done them a certain way. Deburring for instance - I can't begin to think of how many tens of thousands of holes I have deburred (both sides!) on countless airplanes. Drill, debur, repeat... the mantra of the metal airplane builder. I have almost always used a hand-crank deburring tool with two or three flutes for the job, and I can do it while watching TV or (probably) in my sleep. One and a half turns, then on to the next hole, endlessly. Continue reading "Old Dog, New Trick"