Upside Down with Trig

TT22 Controller When panel space and ADS-B compliance converge, Trig’s TT21 compact transponder is worth a look. It fits a 2-in. hole and is just 3 ½-in. deep including wiring.
TT22 Controller
When panel space and ADS-B compliance converge, Trig's TT21 compact transponder is worth a look. It fits a 2-in. hole and is just 3 ½-in. deep including wiring.

Trig Avionics, (AirVenture Hangar C) has a mantra we can appreciate - provide avionics with the features pilots really use and don't mind the fluff. Their Air Venture news today is they've gained STC approval for their panel mount TT31 and (within days) compact TT22 transponders. Both play nice with Garmin GPS sources, namely the popular GTN series.

As an ADS-B out provider, the TT31 and 22 are intriguing as the TT31 mates to the King KT76A/KT78A tray and antenna. For our space-constrained experimentals, the TT22 fits in a 2-in. round hole and is just 2-in. deep (3 ½-in. including the wiring harness).

[sc:ad180]Retail pricing (expect a bit less on the street) is $2,925 for the TT31 and $2,650 for the TT21. Units ship by the end of 2015.

Also interesting, Trig offers TY96 and TY97 comm radios along with TMA44 and TMA45 audio panels. This gear has also been part of the STC trials without issue, and one of the airplanes used was a Pitts Special. The FAA took special interest in that application, requesting loops, rolls and all the rest to determine if acro was detrimental to ADS-B functionality. Trig reports it all worked as designed, with the maneuvers easily seen in detail. All very Orwellian considering ADS-B will broadcast your high-g stunts and your N-number directly to Big Brother.

Getting back to the radios, the TY96 is nicely featured with stereo intercom and aux input at $2,855 retail and the all-dancing TY97 brings $3,600. The audio panels differ in the TMA45 adds Bluetooth and stereo music capability. The TMA44 is $1,280 and the TMA45 $2,160.

Tom Wilson

Tom Wilson is a professional magazine writer and nurtures an ongoing affair with all things internal combustion. His writing is most often found in automotive magazines, but aviation is his first love. Working as a line boy, he learned to fly while in high school, but still hasn't mastered the art of keeping a paper chart in an open cockpit.

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