Remaster 2300 Turbo

Joe Horvath of Revmaster gave his usual excellent, fact-filled briefing at the Alternative Engine Conference. And as always, it was a pleasure to listen to his voice of experience; it's clear he and his partners know what they are talking about when it comes to VW engines.

Revmaster brought this 2300 Turbo display engine to the Alternative Engine Conference. Here the hand-fabbed, low-profile, aluminum intake manifold shows well, along with the fourth main bearing collar just in front of the gold-painted magnesium case. An aluminum case option is available for those planning on twiddling with a boost knob, but it costs more, adds 18 lbs and runs just a tick higher oil temps.
Revmaster brought this 2300 Turbo display engine to the Alternative Engine Conference. Here the hand-fabbed, low-profile, aluminum intake manifold shows well, along with the fourth main bearing collar just in front of the gold-painted magnesium case. An aluminum case option is available for those planning on twiddling with a boost knob, but it costs more, adds 18 lbs and runs just a tick higher oil temps.

For 2015 the big Revmaster news is the turbonormalized version of their 2300 VW-based engine.  Horvath’s remarks on the 2300 Turbo began with the engines leading up to the current turbo effort, meaning he started with Revmaster’s 1968 entry into the VW-based aviation engine world! Notably, the popular 2100 Revmaster was turbocharged in a few special applications back in the ‘70s, these included an example which powered itself to Paraguay on a modified RF-5 motorglider. Besting 21,000 ft. to get over the Andes, that early effort, along with others, plus a lifetime hot rodding seriously fast VW-based race cars has lead to a wealth of understanding of what the turbonormalized VW engine needs in aircraft applications.

Main point of the 2300 Turbo is it originates with the ubiquitous Type 1 VW engine architecture. The magnesium case is sourced from Brazil and final machined by Revmaster in the U.S. to ensure proper main bearing alignment, lifter bore integrity and the necessary enlarged cylinder openings. The cylinder heads are Revmaster’s own aluminum castings with high-nickel alloy valve seats and stainless steel valves for valve train stability; they also feature CNC’d combustion chambers. Likewise, the unique Revmaster crankshaft boasts a larger 60 mm center main bearing, better material and finer machining to provide the expected 1,200 hour TBO.

All the exhaust and turbo packaging congregates in the left rear corner of the 2300 Turbo Revmaster. With almost no boost there is no need for charge cooling, hence the lack of expensive, heavy, difficult to package intercoolers. A scavenge pump is provided to remove oil from the turbocharger.
All the exhaust and turbo packaging congregates in the left rear corner of the 2300 Turbo Revmaster. With almost no boost there is no need for charge cooling, hence the lack of expensive, heavy, difficult to package intercoolers. A scavenge pump is provided to remove oil from the turbocharger.

In many ways the 2300 Turbo is mechanically identical to the naturally aspirated version that’s long been available. Revmaster’s unique and cost-effective cast aluminum fourth main bearing appendage is carried over (stock VW’s are 3-main bearing engines; more than 1800cc calls for something more robust than a shrink-fit fourth main fitment). Besides extra support, the fourth main bearing casting also provides for prop governor oil to support the constant speed props Horvath believes are much better for turbo engines.

Revmaster is using a wastegated Garrett turbo on their development engine, but Horvath says he’s not so sure the wastegate will be necessary or offered on the production engines.
Revmaster is using a wastegated Garrett turbo on their development engine, but Horvath says he’s not so sure the wastegate will be necessary or offered on the production engines.

The Revmaster cylinder heads are dual plug, and the battery-less, flywheel trigger ignition system is fully redundant throughout, including a coil for each sparkplug. Timing is fixed, something Horvath is wanting to improve when he has the time to develop a movable timing plate for high altitude cruising.

Detailing is very nice on the Revmaster engines, including these classy valve covers. About the only VW-sourced part in the engine is the case; the rest is Revmaster developed parts or from top-level aftermarket suppliers.
Detailing is very nice on the Revmaster engines, including these classy valve covers. About the only VW-sourced part in the engine is the case; the rest is Revmaster developed parts or from top-level aftermarket suppliers.

Currently finishing development and on the dyno for final tuning and verification, the 2300 Turbo should be rated at 85 to possibly 90 hp, with a critical altitude around 12,000 ft. Expect a price premium of $3,000 to $3,500 over the naturally aspirated 2300 Revmaster, along with 3-4 month lead times to delivery once an order has been placed. Horvath says the Turbo will go on sale no earlier than the spring of 2016, but will definitely be available in 2016.

At least as much oil-cooled as air-cooled, the Revmaster engines feature extensive oil cooling efforts. The 2300 Turbo uses the black under-sump oil cooler to keep the lube at the preferred 180 degrees F, and no more than 220 degrees F maximum. Larger Revmaster oil pump gears give a minimum of 40 psi oil pressure at operating rpm.
At least as much oil-cooled as air-cooled, the Revmaster engines feature extensive oil cooling efforts. The 2300 Turbo uses the black under-sump oil cooler to keep the lube at the preferred 180 degrees F, and no more than 220 degrees F maximum. Larger Revmaster oil pump gears give a minimum of 40 psi oil pressure at operating rpm.

 

Revmaster has found the popular Zenith carburetors are “ice makers” on aircraft, so they provide their own pressure carburetor. It is far less ice-prone and only needs warm under-cowl air under severe conditions. The definitely preferred fuel is 100LL, but 95 octane mogas (ethanol-free) will work as well.
Revmaster has found the popular Zenith carburetors are “ice makers” on aircraft, so they provide their own pressure carburetor. It is far less ice-prone and only needs warm under-cowl air under severe conditions. The definitely preferred fuel is 100LL, but 95 octane mogas (ethanol-free) will work as well.

Tom Wilson

Tom Wilson is a professional magazine writer and nurtures an ongoing affair with all things internal combustion. His writing is most often found in automotive magazines, but aviation is his first love. Working as a line boy, he learned to fly while in high school, but still hasn't mastered the art of keeping a paper chart in an open cockpit.

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