Details, details, details...

John Stahr sprays white paint as the final area paint on Paul Dye's SubSonex. Most of the jet is masked to protect the earlier laid colors.
John Stahr sprays white paint as the final area paint on Paul Dye's SubSonex. Most of the jet is masked to protect the earlier laid colors.

The fifth day started bright and early with the limbering up of the spray gun and the deployment of white - the final major color to go on the jet. John Stahr checked over the masking to make sure it was all correct before shooting three coats of the bright white that ironically will probably be listed as the major color of the airplane when filing a flight plan... "white/red/black".  A short break followed to let the paint set up, then unmasking began - the jet revealed in all its basic glory. We say basic because when the masking was removed, the detailing began. Continue reading "Details, details, details..."

Now--In Living Color!

With black going on, the jet began to show some real personality.
With black going on, the jet began to show some real personality.

Work continued on the jet's paint job on Tuesday--and a long day it was. The detailed layout was completed the day before, so it was mostly a matter of masking off the various colors one at a time, using the additive process. This meant masking for the silver, then the black, and then the red. All three colors were shot with little need to worry about overspray, because once a color was shot, it was covered up - and the spots that hadn't yet received their final color were fine if they got some overspray - because they would get their color later. Continue reading "Now--In Living Color!"

Ready for Paint!

With the first engine start and initial taxi testing out of the way (see and hear it below), the little jet is cocooned in the shop, awaiting the arrival of the paint master - John Stahr of Stahr Design, noted for airbrush work on aircraft large and small. And they don't come much smaller than the SubSonex! After months of back and forth design work, we've settled on a concept that we like and John is enthusiastic about. Paint jobs are always a matter of taste, and trying to please every eye is impossible - but if you look back at the airplane as you leave the hangar saying "I still like that" years later, you know you've hit the mark. Continue reading "Ready for Paint!"

Making Chips for a Purpose!

The plain DPDT toggle switch.

It's nice to have a milling machine, and even nicer to have a specific task for which it is well suited!

The flaps in the original Subsonex were manual, with a lever on the left side of the cockpit. A recent change added an electric option, and I went with that in my jet - which meant I needed a place for a flap switch. I managed to shoehorn a DPDT toggle switch into the only available space on the left side of the cockpit, but the old human factors and cockpit design engineer in me just wasn't happy with a simple toggle bat for an important switch. Continue reading "Making Chips for a Purpose!"