Dan McElroy’s Questair Venture

I just finished my Venture, which was started 20 years ago. There are marriages that have not lasted 20 years, there are careers that have not lasted 20 years, and there are whole lives that have not lasted 20 years, so how do you stay working on a project for 20 years?

In this fast-paced world today, we all forget to smell the roses, walk the paths, take the time to say “Hi,” and listen to ourselves and do what we need to do to keep our sanity while encouraging our artistic side. Building is a journey, not an end result. A homebuilt is an expression of your artistic side, a way to connect with yourself and a way of life.

My first flight went well, and the engine break-in is proceeding well. I expanded the envelope to about 245 knots indicated (redline is 300), rolled it three times, experimented with the trim, flaps and controls, and know I have a lot more to accomplish. I intend to enjoy every phase of the journey.

Ed and Kaye Pierson's Lockwood AirCam

My wife and I finally completed our Lockwood AirCam after nearly 10 years of work. It’s equipped with Rotax 912S engines, MGL EFIS and I-K Technologies engine instruments. The fabric and paint were applied using Stewart Systems products. We did all the work ourselves, including the paint.

The airplane flew for the first time on August 2, 2009, and performed flawlessly. We have nearly 50 hours on it so far with only minor tweaking required. We’d have put on more hours but it’s too cold to fly in the winter. (Lockwood, we need that canopy!) The AirCam is a spectacular performer with a 2000-fpm rate of climb solo.

Our thanks go out to all who helped us turn out a safe aircraft, especially the EAA tech counselors who guided us along the way.

Ted Sutton’s Just Aircraft Highlander, Parker, Arizona

I took my demo flight with Gary Schmitt at Oshkosh 2004, and a friend helped me with the down payment for the show price. The kit was delivered to Aerocolor in Homedale, Idaho, that December. I lived in the hangar loft while owner John Rodgers and Jason Dilworth helped me craft the WW-II wannabe primary trainer I desired. After many months of absences from my wife, N9939 became an exciting reality. It was awarded Second Place place custom tube and fabric at Copperstate in ’06. I like the 912S, Kiev prop, Icom IC-200A, Garmin GTX 320 transponder and the MGL Avionics Enigma glass instrument package. The easy folding wings and huge baggage area are hard to beat. We have 600 hours on it now and can’t wait to go “buzzin” across the desert southwest some more! I have a lot of videos of us flying to remote locations on my YouTube channel.

Rob Jamros’ Challenger II, Negaunee, Michigan

Construction began on November 3, 2008, in my basement where the airframe and fabric work occupied me during the long Upper Michigan winter. Then I moved to my hangar in May 2009 for painting, final assembly and engine break-in.

On September 1, 2009, it passed inspection and was ready for the maiden flight, which took place without a hitch. What an exhilarating feeling, that first rotation in a craft built with your own hands. The Challenger flies like a dream. Sporting a Rotax 582 powerplant, it has plenty of power for winter flying on skis, and amphibious float flying for the summer. Thanks to Dave Vandenburg, my EAA tech counselor, for his guidance, and especially my wife, Barb, for her assistance and unconditional support during this project.