A New Racing Class at Reno?

Reno PRS 2018 SubSonex Photo: Curtis Noble

Anyone that has an interest in air racing knows that the National Championship Air Races held in Reno, Nevada each September bring racing in a number of different aircraft classes. The biplanes, Formula 1, and Sport classes all feature homebuilts. The T-6, Unlimiteds, and Jet classes bring the noise and speed of the warbirds. But these classes aren't static, and over the years, new groups have appeared. It might take awhile for them to take hold, but where there are airplane drivers arguing over the speed of their particular machine, there is the possibility of a race! Continue reading "A New Racing Class at Reno?"

Homebuilts Soar!

The annual Soaring Society of America convention is underway in Reno, Nevada, and since there are (and always have been) homebuilt sailplanes, we felt it worth the trip so see what's going on in the quieter part of our industry. The first thing to note is that not all sailplanes are that quiet!

Continue reading "Homebuilts Soar!"

Sport Class Mid-Air

Mark Ter Keurs propeller will take more than filing after this morning's close call.

Sunday, September 17, 2017 Reno, NV--The great news is no one was hurt, but there was a rare coming-together during the Sport Medallion final this morning at the National Championship Air Races in Reno, Nevada. Continue reading "Sport Class Mid-Air"

The After-Race

Reno Racing ends every day about 4:30 or 5:00 pm, but that doesn't mean that everyone (or anyone) goes home! Teams have pop-ups and coolers full of refreshments, and as they say - the party is just getting started. It's a relaxing time to be in the pits - the pressure is off, the engines are quiet (except for those who might have experienced problems during the day), and its time to kick back, relax, and trade aviation stories. Continue reading "The After-Race"

Old Friend - New Look!

Back in 2014, we got a chance to fly "Last Lap Player", a Cassutt 111M owned by Creighton King, owner of the rights to the Cassutt plans. The plane was very "original" at the time, built many years before, and showing up at the Reno races pretty much as it was. Being the inveterate tinkerer that he is, King has since replaced the canopy, moved the engine forward six inches, built a new cowl, add swept wing tips, created wing/fuselage intersection fairings, and changed the shape of the fuselage around the instrument panel. All in his spare time, of course, and usually just weeks before he needed to bring the airplane to Reno. He seems to work well under pressure. Continue reading "Old Friend - New Look!"