New Flight Test Manual From EAA

The Experimental Aircraft Association has published a new Flight Test Manual which brings the processes and procedures of professional flight testing to the amateur-built aircraft community.

The 47-page manual is a comprehensive program for amateur-built aircraft flight testing. It includes outlines for each essential test point, as well as a booklet of 19 test cards that can be carried in the aircraft for quick reference and data collection while in flight. Those test cards are similar to those used by professional civilian and military test pilots, and are an exclusive resource for amateur-built aircraft pilots using the EAA manual. Continue reading "New Flight Test Manual From EAA"

Reducing Loss of Control Accidents

Risk Management is an important topic within the EAA, especially when you consider that loss of control accidents are the biggest killer of pilots in the E-AB community. This year, the EAA Pilot Proficiency Center has created three training scenarios for their RedBird Simulations that let pilots experience an engine failure on take-off, the perils of the steep pullout after a low pass, and the feeling of losing it in the base-to-final turn and ending up in a spin. Continue reading "Reducing Loss of Control Accidents"

Problem Arrival

The talk of pilots today at Oshkosh were the many challenging arrivals experienced by many of the thousands of pilots over the last couple of days. The image that you see here is not doctored in any way - that is the way we received it from an experienced pilot who arrived yesterday. If that doesn't scare you, nothing will! Continue reading "Problem Arrival"

Reviewing the NOTAM

If you've been flying in to AirVenture since it was still just called "Oshkosh," you probably have the arrival and departure procedures down cold. There are minor changes or additions to the NOTAM each year of course - but I can't really recall a major change to the procedures themselves in years. Every year we hear suggestions for improvement, but overall, they tend to work pretty well, and I think the powers that be figure more people would mess up if they were changed than if they leave them as they are and just deal with the occasional deviation. Thats' just a guess of course - I have no inside knowledge of how the procedures or book are created. Continue reading "Reviewing the NOTAM"

Nope, no, no way... flying 30+ years!

kinked fuel line

I am often amazed at just how big our margins can be in aviation. Engineering margins, that is - operational margins are as big (or as small) as pilots want to make them. Here is a good case in point. This is the right tank-to-selector fuel line off of a very early two-seat RV. It's been flying for probably well over 30 years. See that crimp? Look more closely - inside the crimp are three very sharp depressions that look like they were made with teeth from a tool of some sort. If you look inside the end of the tube with a bright light, you can actually see each individual tooth mark! Continue reading "Nope, no, no way... flying 30+ years!"

Garmin's new inReach mini two-way satellite communicator

Garmin_InReachMini

Garmin announced the inReach Mini, a smaller and more compact satellite communicator with available two-way messaging and a 24/7 SOS function when combined with an inReach subscription to access the Iridium® satellite network. Measuring just under 4 inches tall by 2 inches wide, and weighing 3.5 ounces, the inReach Mini can easily be carried in a backpack, boat, plane, or glovebox. No more worrying about spotty coverage or being within range of a cell tower - the inReach Mini works anywhere when using the Iridium satellite network. Continue reading "Garmin's new inReach mini two-way satellite communicator"