Power to the Panel!

subsonex-panel-test

When you're elbow deep in wiring, it is motivating once in awhile to clear all of the debris, check all the connections, and apply some voltage to the input side of the airplane, just to watch things light up! (Note all of those caveats - applying power with dangling power and ground wires can lead to grief when electrons flow where they aren't supposed to - test smart!) Continue reading "Power to the Panel!"

Getting Fuelish

Fuel flows in from the right, through the filter, the shut-off valve, and the red cube - then on to the engine.

One of the interesting things about the Subsonex kit is that it is easy to skip around from one task to another as you're building. If I get tired of attaching piano hinges for control surfaces for instance, I can jump over to installing the oxygen system. Exhausted by working down in a footwell to install a ruder pedal? Time to go work on the fuel system! Continue reading "Getting Fuelish"

Easy Hole Spacing

rivet spacing drawing

One of the curses of modern CAD technology is that designers can draw something up, then have the computer dimension it for them on the drawing - very, very precisely. In the case of the drawings I am using on my current project, the drawings tend to dimension to the nearest 1/64th of an inch if you find a line of rivets that has essentially been evenly spaced between two end points, you'll find it a bit tedious to measure each hole's location in 64ths of an inch from an end point. Continue reading "Easy Hole Spacing"

And we're off!

Subsonex Jet ruddervator clecoed

Yes--the new kit is here! Our Subsonex project got underway just this weekend, starting with a complete inventory (of a very complete kit). With all of the bits and pieces stored away in ways that they can be found, I opened the plans to a reasonable place to start, and pulled out the parts for the stabilizers. My first impression was "wow - this is amazing". My second impression was "Wow - this is going to go together fast!" All parts are match-hole construction - that means that you can grab a handful of silver clecos and fasten ribs to spars, and skins to ribs, all without pulling out a drill. Continue reading "And we're off!"

Mixing it Up

y-tail-xenos

There are all sorts of things I would like to know, but never take the time to learn - so much stuff, so little time... So I figure that some stuff will just have to wait until I need it. Such is the case of just how you mechanize a V-tail. You have two surfaces doing the work of three on a conventional tail - two ruddervators instead of two elevators and a rudder.

The ruddervators work like elevators in that they move up and down to control pitch - but they also move more in one direction than the other when the pilot pushes a rudder pedal. The two surfaces effectively "mix" the inputs from both pitch and yaw controls. Sounds complicated, right? So... how exactly is this done?

Continue reading "Mixing it Up"